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I Know I've Been Changed

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Download links and information about I Know I've Been Changed by Aaron Neville. This album was released in 2010 and it belongs to Hip Hop/R&B, Soul, Gospel genres. It contains 12 tracks with total duration of 42:38 minutes.

Artist: Aaron Neville
Release date: 2010
Genre: Hip Hop/R&B, Soul, Gospel
Tracks: 12
Duration: 42:38
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Tracks

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No. Title Length
1. Stand By Me 3:17
2. I Know I've Been Changed 3:37
3. I Done Made Up My Mind 4:03
4. I Am a Pilgrim 3:22
5. Don't Let Him Ride 4:50
6. You've Got to Move 2:47
7. Oh Freedom 4:02
8. Tell Me What Kind of Man Jesus Is 3:38
9. Live So God Can Use Me 3:56
10. Meetin' At the Building 2:44
11. I'm So Glad (Trouble Don't Last) 3:47
12. There's a God Somewhere 2:35

Details

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Aaron Neville, at 69 years of age, marks 50 years of recording with his 2010 gospel album, I Know I've Been Changed, employing as part of his backup band the producer of his first session back in 1960, Allen Toussaint. This is a traditional gospel set, full of familiar old songs and spirituals, and Toussaint's piano, redolent of New Orleans R&B, is the dominant musical instrument in the small-band arrangements of tracks produced by Joe Henry. Henry has gone for an easygoing, rootsy sound, the better to support Neville's immediately identifiable high-tenor vocals, which, as usual, break into expressive falsetto notes at unexpected moments. Many of these songs are usually heard as rave-ups to stir the faithful from their pews, but Neville, making his first gospel recording since 2003's Believe, and thus his first since Hurricane Katrina, is naturally a singer full of vulnerability rather than triumph, and there is often a mournful tone to the performances. One exception is the version of "You Got to Move," which, paced by Toussaint's rolling pattern, is given more buoyancy than it sometimes has. But that is followed by a slow, mournful "Oh Freedom," a reading that places emphasis on its chorus, "Before I'd be a slave/I'd be buried in my grave/And go home to my Lord/And be free." It would be easy to imagine the displaced residents of the Ninth Ward singing along with Neville on "I'm So Glad," a song with a deceptively cheery title, "I'm so glad that trouble don't last always," adding "Oh, my Lord, what shall I do?" An answer might be to have faith, which seems to be the conclusion of the next and final song, "There's a God Somewhere." On I Know I've Been Changed, Neville seems to be imploring God to come back to New Orleans.