Create account Log in

Both Sides


Download links and information about Both Sides by Alexis Korner. This album was released in 1970 and it belongs to Blues, Rock, Blues Rock, Country genres. It contains 17 tracks with total duration of 01:18:58 minutes.

Artist: Alexis Korner
Release date: 1970
Genre: Blues, Rock, Blues Rock, Country
Tracks: 17
Duration: 01:18:58
Buy on iTunes $6.99
Buy on iTunes $6.99


No. Title Length
1. Mighty-Mighty Spade and Whitey 4:06
2. Funky 3:04
3. Wild Injun Woman 3:56
4. To Whom It May Concern 3:35
5. I See It 2:32
6. You Don't Miss Your Water (Till Your Well Runs Dry) 3:51
7. The Duo Thing (Live) 8:02
8. Rosie (Live) 11:49
9. New Worried Blues (Live) 4:54
10. Will the Circle Be Unbroken (Live) 3:57
11. Polly Put the Kettle On (Live) 1:39
12. The Clapping Song (Live) 4:30
13. Rosie 5:13
14. Mary Open the Door 4:44
15. Soul Twist 4:17
16. Jesus Is Just Alright 2:55
17. Rock Me (Live) 5:54



By 1970, there were certain things you could count on with an Alexis Korner album. Those included an almost manic stylistic diversity that ran from near-trad jazz and blues to near-blues-rock; a top-notch cast of supporting musicians, and seriously inconsistent quality, in large part because of Korner's hoarse lead vocals. Both Sides has all of these, and remains one of his more obscure efforts, in part because it was issued only in Germany and Holland. Certainly Korner enlisted some top talent, including Free's Andy Fraser on bass; Paul Rodgers (also of Free) on backing vocals; Lol Coxhill on tenor and soprano sax; John Marshall on drums, and Ray Warleigh on sax. Give Korner credit, too, for trying to move with the times, including some nods to soul and heavy rock music along with the blues and jazz that were at his musical core, and making substantial use of a horn section within a loosely blues-oriented format. Still, it must be acknowledged that the material was both erratic and wildly eclectic in nature, including a cover of Curtis Mayfield's "Mighty-Mighty Spade and Whitey"; a generic soul-rock instrumental (the Korner-penned "Funky"); a Free cover, "Wild Injun Woman," which was much better suited to Free themselves, and yet another cover, of the Staple Singers' "I See It," which couldn't help but pale next to the original. Adding to the unevenness are a couple of live cuts, one of them a jazzy eight-minute instrumental duet between Warleigh and bassist Colin Hodgkinson, the other a ragged, overlong 12-minute performance of the traditional blues "Rosie." Korner came off best on the gentle folk-blues of his self-penned "To Whom It May Concern" and an interpretation of William Bell's "You Don't Miss Your Water (Til Your Well Runs Dry)" that, while again no match for other versions, is heartfelt and doesn't over-reach.