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Dark One


Download links and information about Dark One by Alsace Lorraine. This album was released in 2007 and it belongs to Electronica, Pop, Alternative genres. It contains 15 tracks with total duration of 52:41 minutes.

Artist: Alsace Lorraine
Release date: 2007
Genre: Electronica, Pop, Alternative
Tracks: 15
Duration: 52:41
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No. Title Length
1. As We Fight 3:58
2. Dulce Et Decorum 4:07
3. Call for Papers 4:02
4. The Tall Grass 2:11
5. Lost Province 4:25
6. One Day, Far Off, If the World Forgot 4:01
7. The Senile Rings 3:46
8. Claire 3:09
9. Stormy Sky (Skate or Die) 2:10
10. Burden Down 3:01
11. Go from My Window (Flooded Interstate) 4:12
12. No Stars 2:46
13. Call for Papers (Ian Catt Mix) 3:37
14. The Gravel Dew 3:49
15. The Tall Grass (Robin Guthrie Mix) 3:27



It's been so long since Alsace Lorraine's 2001 debut album that the follow-up, Dark One, has an oddly retro quality: more than a few listeners will hear this blend of coolly detached male/female vocals, minimalist synths, and twee pop melodies and think, "Oh yes, I remember when bands sounded like this." Despite the inherent nostalgia for the late '90s on writer/producer Paul Francke's second album under this project name, Dark One actually features some key changes from the debut, Through Small Windows. Former lead singer Caitlin Brice is almost entirely absent, with the chanteuse role instead played by Argentinean star Isol, who splits the vocals with Francke; both she and the album would be better served by an even more prominent placement, because Francke's relatively anonymous vocals don't do his songs many favors. "Moody" is the operative term for these largely minor-key, midtempo tunes, with watery melodies perfectly suited to Francke's relaxed beats and spacious arrangements. However, the remixes by Ian Catt ("Call for Papers") and especially Robin Guthrie (who brings his trademark reverb washes to bear on the shimmering "The Tall Grass") provide some much needed sonic variety to this thoroughly pleasant but somewhat samey album, which suggests that perhaps Francke's musical vision needs a more active set of collaborators to help it achieve its full fruition.