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Something About You

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Download links and information about Something About You by Angela Bofill. This album was released in 1981 and it belongs to Hip Hop/R&B, Soul, Rock, Dancefloor, Disco, Dance Pop, Alternative genres. It contains 15 tracks with total duration of 58:14 minutes.

Artist: Angela Bofill
Release date: 1981
Genre: Hip Hop/R&B, Soul, Rock, Dancefloor, Disco, Dance Pop, Alternative
Tracks: 15
Duration: 58:14
Buy on iTunes $9.99
Buy on Amazon $9.99
Buy on Music Bazaar €1.22

Tracks

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No. Title Length
1. Something About You 4:03
2. Break It to Me Gently 3:52
3. On and On 3:22
4. Tropical Love 5:58
5. You Should Know By Now 3:29
6. Only Love 4:26
7. Holdin' Out for Love 3:22
8. Stop Look Listen 4:30
9. I Do Love You 4:33
10. Three Blind Mice 0:17
11. Time to Say Goodbye 5:19
12. Never Wanna Be Without Your Love 3:55
13. Esperando Al Amor (Spanish Version of "Holdin' Out for Love") 3:46
14. Love Light 3:55
15. Rhythm of Your Mind 3:27

Details

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The 1981 set Something About You was Angela Bofill’s first album for Arista. That meant it was overseen by industry guru Clive Davis, who was just starting to cement his legacy as a mentor to strong female singers. The album was produced by Narada Michael Walden, a veteran jazz drummer–turned–producer who'd soon hit it big working with Whitney Houston. While Something About You flattened some of the jazz pedigree that had made Bofill’s first albums so creatively successful, Davis and Walden helped win her a whole new audience with the snappy pop tunes “Holdin’ Out for Love” and “Something About You.” “Tropical Love” and “I Do Love You” were as lithe and silky as anything on Michael Jackson’s Off the Wall, but love ballads were quickly becoming Bofill’s specialty. As songs, there's nothing particularly unique about “You Should Know by Now,” “Break It to Me Gently," and “Time to Say Goodbye,” but the subtlety and truth of Bofill’s voice make them special. Even when working with the generic pop material that Davis favored, Bofill brought her songs a jazz chanteuse’s attention to phrasing and storytelling.