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Seven Letters


Download links and information about Seven Letters by Ben E. King. This album was released in 1965 and it belongs to Hip Hop/R&B, Soul, Rock, Pop genres. It contains 12 tracks with total duration of 31:38 minutes.

Artist: Ben E. King
Release date: 1965
Genre: Hip Hop/R&B, Soul, Rock, Pop
Tracks: 12
Duration: 31:38
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No. Title Length
1. Seven Letters 2:52
2. River of Tears 2:26
3. I'm Standing By 2:49
4. Jamaica 2:39
5. Down Home 2:49
6. Si Senor 2:32
7. It's All Over 3:16
8. Let the Water Run Down 2:35
9. This Is My Dream 2:37
10. It's No Good for Me 2:20
11. In the Middle of the Night 2:31
12. Don't Drive Me Away 2:12



The original notes to the Seven Letters album indicate that it is the most diverse album of material that Ben E. King had ever recorded, and they're right. The range of material here, cut over a period of more than two years, included some impassioned soul music — "River of Tears," "I'm Standing By," "It's All Over," "In the Middle of the Night," and the title track — as well as some very personal pop ("Jamaica") and novelty ("Si Senor") tunes, and towering performances throughout. The requisite string-laden orchestral backings are present, courtesy of producers Leiber & Stoller, Jerry Wexler, Ahmet Ertegun, and the various arrangers, but there are also some nicely stripped down, more basic soul numbers. Interestingly, "Jamaica" was written by King in the wake of his 1961 tour of the island (soon to be island-nation), an event that helped spark a boom in local ska and reggae performers who were inspired by the presence of American soul stars like King on tour — the song practically chronicles the spawning of the seed that led to the ska and reggae booms (which Atlantic would grab a piece of, not only by signing Byron Lee and securing a distribution agreement with him for the Cayman Islands, but also through Eric Clapton's efforts on Bob Marley's behalf less than a decade later). The album has not a single weak spot, and boasts some strong contributions by several outside songwriters including Carole King and Gerry Goffin, whose gorgeous "Down Home" provided the vehicle for King's best singing on the entire record. Not that it did much for him at the time of its release — it had no weak spots, but also no major hits (even "I'm Standing By" was a failed follow-up to "Stand By Me," and this was the last of four Ben E. King albums issued by Atlantic in the United States. Like two of its predecessors, it disappeared without reaching any but King's hardcore audience, thus making it a choice collector's item. It lacked the hook of a massive hit single like a "Stand By Me" or a "Spanish Harlem" for a wider audience to grab onto. [Listeners are also advised to see Anthology Four: Seven Letters.]