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900 Miles and Other R.R. Songs

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Download links and information about 900 Miles and Other R.R. Songs by Cisco Houston. This album was released in 1953 and it belongs to World Music, Songwriter/Lyricist genres. It contains 20 tracks with total duration of 43:06 minutes.

Artist: Cisco Houston
Release date: 1953
Genre: World Music, Songwriter/Lyricist
Tracks: 20
Duration: 43:06
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Tracks

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No. Title Length
1. 900 Miles 3:41
2. Gettin' Up Holler 1:26
3. The Roamer 0:45
4. The Wreck of the Old '97 1:21
5. Hobo Bill 1:29
6. The Great American Bum 1:55
7. The Brave Engineer 1:54
8. The Gambler 1:42
9. The Rambler 1:30
10. Railroad Bill 1:47
11. Worried Man Blues 3:01
12. Chisholm Trail 2:00
13. Diamond Joe 2:29
14. Old Paint 2:02
15. Little Joe, The Wrangler 2:41
16. The Dying Cowboy 3:03
17. Stewball 2:26
18. Trouble In Mind 3:29
19. Sweet Betsy from Pike 2:04
20. Tying a Knot In the Devil's Tail 2:21

Details

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With his dashing good looks, pencil-thin mustache, and athlete’s build, Cisco Houston looked more movie star than folk singer. He was bumming around the fringes of Hollywood in the late ‘30s, trying to land bit film parts, when he met singer Woody Guthrie, who was then performing on the local KFVD radio station. Woody and Cisco forged a quick friendship and made an immediate musical connection; Houston, though naturally a baritone, could sing high tenor harmonies that perfectly complemented Guthrie’s rougher sing-speak style of delivery. Houston spent years as Guthrie’s protégé, learning guitar at his elbow and absorbing his formidable repertoire of traditional and original songs. Eventually, Cisco emerged as a performer in his own right, and this collection gathers together two 10-inch EPs that he recorded for the label in the early ‘50s. Houston’s delivery is far more formal and self-consciously dramatic than his mentor’s, and these songs have a theatrical quality that anticipates the more stylized work of ‘60s-era folk revivalists like Dave Van Ronk and Peter Lafarge.