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And I Love H.E.R. (Original Motion Picture Soundtrack)

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Download links and information about And I Love H.E.R. (Original Motion Picture Soundtrack) by Danny. This album was released in 2008 and it belongs to Hip Hop/R&B, Rap genres. It contains 17 tracks with total duration of 01:11:52 minutes.

Artist: Danny
Release date: 2008
Genre: Hip Hop/R&B, Rap
Tracks: 17
Duration: 01:11:52
Buy on iTunes $9.99

Tracks

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No. Title Length
1. Intro 5:17
2. Guess Who's Back (feat. Naledge) 3:44
3. I Want H.E.R. (She's So Heavy) [feat. Brittany Bosco] 5:06
4. At What Price (feat. Maria) 6:57
5. Jet Set 3:20
6. The Groove 4:57
7. Not the One (feat. Kid Syc) 3:44
8. Misery (feat. Collette) 4:47
9. Intermission (interlude) 4:09
10. Wanderland 4:21
11. Where You Goin' (feat. Maria) 3:27
12. Never Change (feat. Kid Syc and Branden M. Collins) 4:05
13. I Don't Know (feat. Von Pea and Stephanie Mae) 2:49
14. Yoko Ono (feat. Che Grand) 3:49
15. Do You 3:00
16. After the Love Has Gone 4:00
17. Keep Dreamin' 4:20

Details

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It's fitting that, on an album which mutates hip-hop in jokes into lush, solipsistic psychedelia, one of the first lines is a self-serving Def Jux diss. As a production showcase, And I Love H.E.R. may just be the diametric opposite of El-P's sound: fleet and uptempo drums where El-P's lumber murkily, samples pluming like silk here where El-P's stab, whine, and thud. That he casts such lofty contrasts, of course, is Danny Swain's entire intent. As often as his rhymes dip into melancholic self-doubt throughout the record, these starbursts of dusty violins and mariachi horns are the expression of an artist in complete control. Hence these manic flights of artistic whimsy: the Guitar Hero solo on "The Groove," the knowing, indulgent lifts from OutKast and A Tribe Called Quest on "I Want H.E.R. (She's So Heavy)," the audacious syncopation of "Do You." Spaced over 17 tracks and 70 minutes, it's a rich listen, demanding headphones but rewarding the investment. In this regard, it's a release that draws as much from post-millennial Chicago rap (probably the closest scene to which we might peg oddball South Carolinian Danny!) as it does Prince Paul's finest mid-'90s output.