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Hunky Dory

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Download links and information about Hunky Dory by David Bowie. This album was released in 1971 and it belongs to Rock, Glam Rock, Punk, World Music, Pop, Alternative, Songwriter/Lyricist, Theatre/Soundtrack genres. It contains 11 tracks with total duration of 41:32 minutes.

Artist: David Bowie
Release date: 1971
Genre: Rock, Glam Rock, Punk, World Music, Pop, Alternative, Songwriter/Lyricist, Theatre/Soundtrack
Tracks: 11
Duration: 41:32
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Tracks

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No. Title Length
1. Changes (1999 Remaster) 3:37
2. Oh! You Pretty Things (1999 Remaster) 3:12
3. Eight Line Poem (1999 Remaster) 2:55
4. Life On Mars? 3:54
5. Kooks (1999 Remaster) 2:53
6. Quicksand (1999 Remaster) 5:06
7. Fill Your Heart (1999 Remaster) 3:07
8. Andy Warhol (1999 Remaster) 3:56
9. Song For Bob Dylan 4:12
10. Queen Bitch 3:18
11. The Bewlay Brothers (1999 Remaster) 5:22

Details

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Though David Bowie is now enshrined as one of rock's true visionaries, there was a time early in his career when he was clearly searching for his voice. 1971's Hunky Dory helped Bowie find his footing, serving as the folk- and glam-influenced follow-up to the gritty hard rock of The Man Who Sold the World. Its welcome variety set the stage for Bowie's emergence as one of the most versatile artists of the '70s. (His wildly popular Ziggy Stardust persona was on deck.) The album's opening cut, "Changes," eventually became a modest hit and serves as a definitive Bowie anthem. Elsewhere, Bowie's Anthony Newley/English music hall influences are still ripe ("Kooks," "Fill Your Heart," "Andy Warhol"). His attempts at otherworldly singer/songwriterdom (where acoustic and electric guitars are parceled out as required) are appealingly presented on "Song for Bob Dylan" and the ambitiously stream-of-conscious "The Bewlay Boys." Bowie's ambiguous sexuality takes a playful turn with the sparkling glam rock of "Oh! You Pretty Things" and the Lou Reed/Velvet Underground—influenced drive of "Queen Bitch."