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Reveille

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Download links and information about Reveille by Deerhoof. This album was released in 2002 and it belongs to Rock, Indie Rock, Alternative genres. It contains 16 tracks with total duration of 33:27 minutes.

Artist: Deerhoof
Release date: 2002
Genre: Rock, Indie Rock, Alternative
Tracks: 16
Duration: 33:27
Buy on iTunes $9.99
Buy on Amazon $8.99

Tracks

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No. Title Length
1. Sound the Alarm 0:20
2. This Magnificent Bird Will Rise 3:32
3. The Eyebright Bugler 0:42
4. Punch Buggy Valves 1:53
5. No One Fed Me so I Stayed 0:47
6. Our Angel's Ululu 1:41
7. The Last Trumpeter Swan 8:10
8. Top Tim Rubies 1:56
9. Tuning a Stray 0:07
10. Holy Night Fever 1:18
11. All Rise 1:08
12. Frenzied Handsome, Hello! 1:47
13. Days and Nights in the Forest 3:59
14. Hark the Umpire 1:19
15. Cooper 2:04
16. Hallelujah Chorus 2:44

Details

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San Francisco's strident Deerhoof is a much-loved deconstructionist art-pop outfit. The band is part no wave skronk, part Yoko Ono meets the B-52's, and part weirdo J-pop, and continues to push the musical envelope on each new recording. Reveille is a pretty good example of what Deerhoof is capable of. Quite a few of its songs are instrumental, for the most part, helter-skelterish flare-ups with primitive Casio-like bloops and bleeps, angular fizz-pop guitars, and epileptic drum freakouts. Those few songs that feature Satomi Matsuzaki's purring falsetto — her very presence elevates this band above most avant pop groups — have a simplicity and sugar-soaked sweetness, enticing listeners with charm before boxing their ears with an all-out aural assault. Reveille begins with an unassuming spoken word opening before launching into a variety of sounds. "All Rise" has a baseball stadium-cum-church organ feel, and "Days & Nights in the Forest" starts off with progressive jazz elements before introducing other elements. Though Deerhoof reportedly has to be seen performing live — when the bandmembers are able to temper and balance the explosive quiet-loud of their tunes — to be fully appreciated and to get the full effect, this album is as good a place to start your journey as any of the group's recordings.