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The Very Beast Of Dio

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Download links and information about The Very Beast Of Dio by Dio. This album was released in 2010 and it belongs to Rock, Hard Rock, Metal, Heavy Metal genres. It contains 32 tracks with total duration of 02:36:42 minutes.

Artist: Dio
Release date: 2010
Genre: Rock, Hard Rock, Metal, Heavy Metal
Tracks: 32
Duration: 02:36:42
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Tracks

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No. Title Length
1. Stand Up And Shout 3:18
2. Holy Diver 5:54
3. Rainbow In The Dark 4:14
4. Straight Through The Heart 4:34
5. We Rock 4:35
6. The Last In Line 5:44
7. Mystery 3:55
8. King Of Rock And Roll 3:51
9. Sacred Heart 6:29
10. Hungry For Heaven 4:12
11. Rock 'n' Roll Children 4:33
12. Man On The Silver Mountain (Live) 2:28
13. Dream Evil 4:25
14. I Could Have Been A Dreamer 4:44
15. Lock Up The Wolves 8:33
16. Strange Highways 6:52
17. Stand Up And Shout 3:18
18. Holy Diver 5:54
19. Rainbow In The Dark 4:14
20. Straight Through The Heart 4:34
21. We Rock 4:35
22. The Last In Line 5:44
23. Mystery 3:55
24. King Of Rock And Roll 3:51
25. Sacred Heart 6:29
26. Hungry For Heaven 4:12
27. Rock 'n' Roll Children 4:33
28. Man On The Silver Mountain (Live) 2:28
29. Dream Evil 4:25
30. I Could Have Been A Dreamer 4:44
31. Lock Up The Wolves 8:33
32. Strange Highways 6:52

Details

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The reason Ronnie James Dio will always be one of metal's great undying heroes is twofold. Not only did he represent perpetual integrity in the face of shifting trends; he sang and played with total unwavering conviction. There was always the sense that Dio held the biblical blueprint for what metal should be—and that he was willing to protect that blueprint with his life, for the sake of metal’s most faithful. The Very Beast of Dio covers the years between 1982 and 1992. While it contains some of the finest and best-loved songs from one of metal's best-regarded periods—including “Stand Up and Shout,” “Holy Diver,” “Rainbow in the Dark,” and “King of Rock and Roll”—the lesson lies more in his overall approach than his hits. Even when Dio reformed his band in the early '90s—10 years past his commercial peak—the result was a new wave of classic songs (“Lock Up the Wolves,” “Strange Highways”) that were as cutting-edge and aggressive as material from bands half his age. In the end, Dio was great because unlike many metal frontman, he didn’t present a fantasy of heroism—he was the living article.