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Meet the Eels - Essential Eels, Vol. 1 (1996-2006) [Audio Version]

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Download links and information about Meet the Eels - Essential Eels, Vol. 1 (1996-2006) [Audio Version] by Eels. This album was released in 2008 and it belongs to Rock, Alternative genres. It contains 25 tracks with total duration of 01:21:17 minutes.

Artist: Eels
Release date: 2008
Genre: Rock, Alternative
Tracks: 25
Duration: 01:21:17
Buy on iTunes $13.99

Tracks

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No. Title Length
1. Novocaine for the Soul 3:07
2. Susan's House 3:56
3. My Beloved Monster 2:10
4. Your Lucky Day In Hell 4:28
5. 3 Speed 2:43
6. Last Stop: This Town 3:26
7. Climbing to the Moon (Jon Brion Remix) 3:55
8. Flyswatter 3:16
9. I Like Birds 2:33
10. Mr. E's Beautiful Blues 3:59
11. It's a M**********r 2:14
12. Souljacker, Pt. 1 3:15
13. That's Not Really Funny 3:19
14. Fresh Feeling 3:37
15. Get Ur Freak On 3:29
16. Saturday Morning 2:54
17. Love of the Loveless 3:33
18. Dirty Girl (Live At Town Hall) 3:00
19. I Need Some Sleep 2:28
20. Hey Man (Now You're Really Living) 3:01
21. I'm Going to Stop Pretending That I Didn't Break Your Heart 3:55
22. Trouble With Dreams 4:33
23. Railroad Man (Edit) 3:38
24. Losing Streak 2:50
25. I Like Birds (Live 2007) [Bonus Track] 1:58

Details

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This 24-track “Greatest Hits” collection from cult artist Mark Oliver Everett (aka ‘E’), who releases his albums as Eels, works as the straightforward companion piece to the 50-track collection of rarities (Useless Trinkets) that’s been used to further sum up this artistically fertile decade of work. Tracks from each of Eels’ releases are included, running from the 1996 debut Beautiful Freak through the 2006 live album, With Strings: Live at Town Hall. The previously unreleased remix of “Climbing to the Moon” from Jon Brion and a cover of Missy Elliot’s “Get Ur Freak On” should entice completists. But this is essentially a well-researched career overview, providing the full spectrum of E’s prodigious talents. “I’m Going to Stop Pretending That I Didn’t Break Your Heart” is perfect crestfallen pop, meticulously produced without losing its emotive impulse, “Susan’s House” uses a ‘70s funk groove and keyboard with a newscaster’s reportage to nail its sense of loss, while a track such as “Souljacker Part 1” cranks up the amps, and “Saturday Morning” comes barreling out of the garage with its guitars and cheesy organ beautifully distorted. Everett’s one studio rat who can play the boisterous rock performer and the quiet kid in the corner with equal parts energy and finesse.