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Ballads

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Download links and information about Ballads by James Brown. This album was released in 2000 and it belongs to Hip Hop/R&B, Soul, Jazz, Pop, Songwriter/Lyricist genres. It contains 18 tracks with total duration of 56:19 minutes.

Artist: James Brown
Release date: 2000
Genre: Hip Hop/R&B, Soul, Jazz, Pop, Songwriter/Lyricist
Tracks: 18
Duration: 56:19
Buy on iTunes $9.99
Buy on Amazon $9.49

Tracks

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No. Title Length
1. Prisoner of Love (featuring The Famous Flames) 2:32
2. These Foolish Things Remind Me of You 2:49
3. Lost Someone (Strings Version) (featuring The Famous Flames) 3:25
4. So Long (Single Version) (featuring The Famous Flames) 2:47
5. Bewildered (Strings Version) (featuring The Famous Flames) 2:28
6. I Don't Mind (Single Version) (featuring The Famous Flames) 2:46
7. Try Me (Strings Version) (featuring The Famous Flames) 2:35
8. I Wanna Be Around (featuring Sammy Lowe) 2:26
9. I Loves You Porgy (featuring The Famous Flames) 2:36
10. Cottage for Sale (featuring Alfred) 3:29
11. That's My Desire (featuring Oliver Nelson) 4:09
12. I Guess I'll Have to Cry Cry Cry 3:53
13. It's a Man's, Man's, Man's World (Single Version) [Mono] 2:49
14. Georgia On My Mind (Single Version) 4:23
15. If I Ruled the World 3:27
16. I Cried (Single Version) 3:34
17. Sometime 3:09
18. A Man Has to Go Back to the Crossroads 3:02

Details

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Though he’ll doubtless be best remembered for the rhythmic inventions that changed American music, some of James Brown’s touchstones came when he slowed things down. Aside from “Please Please Please,” Ballads collects many of those moments. Focusing on two periods — the late ’50s and early ’60s era leading to and surrounding Live At the Apollo, and the later funk years when Brown would place “Georgia On My Mind” on the B-side of “It’s a New Day” and his civil rights-conscious reading of “If I Ruled the World” on the flip of “I Got the Feelin’” — the disc is a fine showcase for what often comes down to a rough croon. To hear him screaming against the massed orchestral attack of “Prisoner of Love” is to recognize the sound of a man determined to recast all music in his own outsized image.