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SeaQuest DSV (Original Television Soundtrack)

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Download links and information about SeaQuest DSV (Original Television Soundtrack) by John Debney. This album was released in 1995 and it belongs to World Music, Theatre/Soundtrack genres. It contains 14 tracks with total duration of 29:42 minutes.

Artist: John Debney
Release date: 1995
Genre: World Music, Theatre/Soundtrack
Tracks: 14
Duration: 29:42
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Buy on iTunes $9.99

Tracks

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No. Title Length
1. To Be or Not to Be: Main Title 1:03
2. To Be or Not to Be: Preparing for Battle 2:51
3. To Be or Not to Be: Bridger's Dream 0:52
4. To Be or Not to Be: Uncharted Waters 2:06
5. To Be or Not to Be: First Engagement 3:18
6. To Be or Not to Be: Darwin Speaks 0:58
7. To Be or Not to Be: Dangerous Adversary 1:34
8. To Be or Not to Be: To Adventures Bold 1:31
9. Waltz With the Dead (From "Knight of Shadows") 2:48
10. The Forgiving / Resurrection (From "Knight of Shadows") 4:53
11. The Discovery (From "Such Great Patience") 2:15
12. Lucas Meets the Alien (From "Such Great Patience") 2:30
13. Solemn Oath (From "Such Great Patience") 2:26
14. End Credits (From "Such Great Patience") 0:37

Details

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After first attracting the attention of sci-fi nerds via his work on the syndicated TV series Star Trek: The Next Generation, composer John Debney transitioned from outer space to ocean floor with his scores for the short-lived NBC prime-time series SeaQuest DSV. This Varese Sarabande soundtrack CD compiles Debney's scores for three episodes of the series, and the emphasis here is on pure action. The music does a vivid job of evoking the mystery and danger of the undersea milieu, employing old-fashioned brass and strings to conjure the cliffhanger heroism of cinematic adventures of yore. A little of SeaQuest DSV goes a long way, however, the restraints of episodic television force Debney to operate within a narrow stylistic window, and while he proves eminently capable of sweeping action themes, one wishes the show's producers would allow him the chance to score some more intimate and human sequences as well.