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Hooker 'N Heat

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Download links and information about Hooker 'N Heat by John Lee Hooker, Canned Heat. This album was released in 1991 and it belongs to Blues, Rock, Blues Rock, Country, Acoustic genres. It contains 17 tracks with total duration of 01:26:21 minutes.

Artist: John Lee Hooker, Canned Heat
Release date: 1991
Genre: Blues, Rock, Blues Rock, Country, Acoustic
Tracks: 17
Duration: 01:26:21
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Tracks

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No. Title Length
1. Messin' With The Hook 3:23
2. The Feelin' Is Gone 4:32
3. Send Me A Pillow 4:48
4. Sittin' Here Thinkin 4:07
5. Meet Me In The Bottom 3:34
6. Alimonia Blues 4:31
7. Drifter 4:57
8. You Talk Too Much 3:16
9. Burning Hell 5:28
10. Bottle Up And Go 2:27
11. The World Today 7:47
12. I Got My Eyes On You 4:26
13. Whiskey And Wimmen' 4:37
14. Just You And Me 7:42
15. Let's Make It (1970) 4:06
16. Peavine 5:07
17. Boogie Chillen No. 2 11:33

Details

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"I dig this kid's harmonica, man. I don't know how he follow me, but he do." That's what John Lee Hooker says about Canned Heat's Alan "Blind Owl" Wilson in the studio chatter captured on this double-length album. To a bunch of blueshounds like Canned Heat, there could have been no higher praise. Canned Heat were among the most accomplished blues-rock bands of the '60s and '70s, largely because of their natural feeling for the blues, which is amply displayed on this collaboration with Hooker. Instead of trying to squeeze him into their sound or impose themselves upon his, Canned Heat wisely give the blues legend miles of room. The band don't even play on the first half of the album, letting Hooker's mournful moan and stormy guitar stand on their own. When the Heat is finally turned on, they sound like they've been banging out the blues-boogie beat behind Hooker their whole lives. For his part, Hooker sounds uncommonly energized fronting the band on tunes like "Let's Make It" and "Peavine." For this moment in time, music became magical enough to make the generation gap disappear.