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Lincoln (Original Motion Picture Soundtrack)

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Download links and information about Lincoln (Original Motion Picture Soundtrack) by John Williams. This album was released in 2012 and it belongs to Theatre/Soundtrack genres. It contains 17 tracks with total duration of 58:46 minutes.

Artist: John Williams
Release date: 2012
Genre: Theatre/Soundtrack
Tracks: 17
Duration: 58:46
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Tracks

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No. Title Length
1. The People's House (featuring Chris Martin, Chicago Symphony Orchestra, Randy Kerber, Chicago Symphony Chorus, Robert Chen, Stephen Williamson, David McGill) 3:43
2. The Purpose of the Amendment (featuring Chris Martin, Chicago Symphony Orchestra, Randy Kerber, Chicago Symphony Chorus, Robert Chen, Stephen Williamson, David McGill) 3:07
3. Getting Out the Vote (featuring Chris Martin, Chicago Symphony Orchestra, Randy Kerber, Chicago Symphony Chorus, Robert Chen, Stephen Williamson, David McGill) 2:49
4. The American Process (featuring Chris Martin, Chicago Symphony Orchestra, Randy Kerber, Chicago Symphony Chorus, Robert Chen, Stephen Williamson, David McGill) 3:57
5. The Blue and Grey (featuring Chris Martin, Chicago Symphony Orchestra, Randy Kerber, Chicago Symphony Chorus, Robert Chen, Stephen Williamson, David McGill) 3:00
6. "With Malice Toward None" (featuring Chris Martin, Chicago Symphony Orchestra, Randy Kerber, Chicago Symphony Chorus, Robert Chen, Stephen Williamson, David McGill) 1:51
7. Call to Muster and Battle Cry of Freedom (featuring Chris Martin, Chicago Symphony Orchestra, Randy Kerber, Chicago Symphony Chorus, Robert Chen, Stephen Williamson, David McGill) 2:17
8. The Southern Delegation and the Dream (featuring Chris Martin, Chicago Symphony Orchestra, Randy Kerber, Chicago Symphony Chorus, Robert Chen, Stephen Williamson, David McGill) 4:43
9. Father and Son (featuring Chris Martin, Chicago Symphony Orchestra, Randy Kerber, Chicago Symphony Chorus, Robert Chen, Stephen Williamson, David McGill) 1:42
10. The Race to the House (featuring Chris Martin, Chicago Symphony Orchestra, Randy Kerber, Chicago Symphony Chorus, Robert Chen, Stephen Williamson, David McGill) 2:42
11. Equality Under the Law (featuring Chris Martin, Chicago Symphony Orchestra, Randy Kerber, Chicago Symphony Chorus, Robert Chen, Stephen Williamson, David McGill) 3:12
12. Freedom's Call (featuring Chris Martin, Chicago Symphony Orchestra, Randy Kerber, Chicago Symphony Chorus, Robert Chen, Stephen Williamson, David McGill) 6:08
13. Elegy (featuring Chris Martin, Chicago Symphony Orchestra, Randy Kerber, Chicago Symphony Chorus, Robert Chen, Stephen Williamson, David McGill) 2:35
14. Remembering Willie (featuring Chris Martin, Chicago Symphony Orchestra, Randy Kerber, Chicago Symphony Chorus, Robert Chen, Stephen Williamson, David McGill) 1:51
15. Appomattox, April 9, 1865 (featuring Chris Martin, Chicago Symphony Orchestra, Randy Kerber, Chicago Symphony Chorus, Robert Chen, Stephen Williamson, David McGill) 2:38
16. The Peterson House and Finale (featuring Chris Martin, Chicago Symphony Orchestra, Randy Kerber, Chicago Symphony Chorus, Robert Chen, Stephen Williamson, David McGill) 11:00
17. "With Malice Toward None" (Piano Solo) (featuring Chris Martin, Chicago Symphony Orchestra, Randy Kerber, Chicago Symphony Chorus, Robert Chen, Stephen Williamson, David McGill) 1:31

Details

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John Williams punctuated a month in Abraham Lincoln's life with the grand orchestral aplomb that’s synonymous with his life’s work. But something about Williams’ chemistry with Steven Spielberg can bring a whole package to life, and fittingly, Williams’ score for 2012’s Lincoln is no exception. Right from the opening composition, “The People’s House,” there’s a familiar emotional swell of orchestral melodies soaring with triumphant bombast. “Getting Out the Vote” cleverly incorporate old-timey fiddles and Dixieland shuffles that are indicative of Lincoln's era, but Williams adds a layer of sublime orchestration to flesh out the string-band style with more dimension. Similarly, “The Race to the House” leans heavily on sepia-toned instrumentation (more than in “Getting Out the Vote”), creating a hot and humid mood to match the pastoral patina of the old American South.