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Nothing's Gonna Change the Way You Feel About Me Now

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Download links and information about Nothing's Gonna Change the Way You Feel About Me Now by Justin Townes Earle. This album was released in 2012 and it belongs to Rock, Country, Alternative Country, Songwriter/Lyricist, Contemporary Folk genres. It contains 11 tracks with total duration of 34:57 minutes.

Artist: Justin Townes Earle
Release date: 2012
Genre: Rock, Country, Alternative Country, Songwriter/Lyricist, Contemporary Folk
Tracks: 11
Duration: 34:57
Buy on iTunes $9.99
Buy on Amazon $5.99
Buy on Amazon $0.89
Buy on Music Bazaar €1.09

Tracks

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No. Title Length
1. Am I That Lonely Tonight? 3:05
2. Look the Other Way 2:30
3. Nothing's Gonna Change the Way You Feel About Me Now 3:05
4. Baby's Got a Bad Idea 2:07
5. Maria 2:36
6. Down On the Lower East Side 3:07
7. Won't Be the Last Time 3:12
8. Memphis in the Rain 2:27
9. Unfortunately, Anna 3:41
10. Movin' On 4:42
11. Automobile Blues 4:25

Details

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Justin Townes Earle’s got the blues. A serious undercurrent of unhappy thoughts courses through Nothing’s Gonna Change, the fourth full-length from the talented Nashville musician. In the place of gospel or rockabilly seasoning, Earle goes to the sound of Memphis soul, with horns, unhurried arrangements, and a voice that often sounds like he’s just taken a gut hit. There are signs that perhaps his struggle to stay outside the hard-partying life has taken a backseat. Lyrics like “I tell her I’ve been getting sick again/we both pretend we don’t know why” suggest he’s not too happy with his current state. On the chillingly beautiful “Unfortunately, Anna,” his frustration and despair is palpable: “I’m feeling low and downright mean,” he breathlessly snarls as a steel guitar exhales in the background. The music ranges from the kind of quiet introspection fans of Nick Lowe will appreciate (“Am I That Lonely Tonight?,” “Won’t Be the Last Time”) to a pop-country blend that recalls Lyle Lovett (“Maria,” “Memphis in the Rain”) and a scattering of horn-inflected barroom shuffles (“Baby’s Got a Bad Idea,” “Look the Other Way”).