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The Nu Nation Project

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Download links and information about The Nu Nation Project by Kirk Franklin. This album was released in 1998 and it belongs to Hip Hop/R&B, Soul, Gospel genres. It contains 17 tracks with total duration of 01:10:59 minutes.

Artist: Kirk Franklin
Release date: 1998
Genre: Hip Hop/R&B, Soul, Gospel
Tracks: 17
Duration: 01:10:59
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Tracks

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No. Title Length
1. Interlude: The Verdict (featuring Kirk Franklin And The Family) 1:30
2. Revolution (featuring Kirk Franklin And The Family) 5:37
3. Lean On Me (featuring Kirk Franklin And The Family) 5:09
4. Something About the Name Jesus 6:08
5. Riverside (featuring Kirk Franklin And The Family) 5:26
6. He Loves Me (featuring Kirk Franklin And The Family) 5:43
7. Gonna Be a Lovely Day (featuring Kirk Franklin And The Family) 5:41
8. Praise Joint (Remix) (featuring Kirk Franklin And The Family) 4:22
9. Hold Me Now (featuring Kirk Franklin And The Family) 5:51
10. You Are (featuring Kirk Franklin And The Family) 3:53
11. Interlude: The Car (Stomp) (featuring Kirk Franklin And The Family) 1:25
12. If You've Been Delivered (featuring Kirk Franklin And The Family) 3:34
13. Smile Again (featuring Kirk Franklin And The Family) 6:52
14. Love (Remix) (featuring Kirk Franklin And The Family) 0:39
15. My Desire (featuring Kirk Franklin And The Family) 4:17
16. Blessing In the Storm (featuring Kirk Franklin And The Family) 3:29
17. I Can (featuring Kirk Franklin And The Family) 1:23

Details

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Kirk Franklin designed The Nu Nation Project as a revitalization of contemporary gospel, a way to bring it to an audience accustomed to the slick, funky innovations of hip-hop and rap. It's an ambitious project, and one that's not too far removed from his earlier records, simply because it finds him adding R&B production techniques and the occasional grandiose flourish, such as the cameos from R. Kelly, Mary J. Blige, and Bono on the admittedly stirring "Lean on Me." Occasionally, the album feels as if Franklin is pushing a bit too hard for the mainstream audience and all that entails (namely, superstardom for himself), but the end result is every bit as engaging as his previous records, thereby confirming his status as one of the true visionaries in '90s contemporary gospel.