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Penderecki: Orchestral Works Vol. 1

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Download links and information about Penderecki: Orchestral Works Vol. 1 by Krzysztof Penderecki. This album was released in 1973 and it belongs to genres. It contains 8 tracks with total duration of 01:17:03 minutes.

Artist: Krzysztof Penderecki
Release date: 1973
Genre:
Tracks: 8
Duration: 01:17:03
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Tracks

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No. Title Length
1. Symphony No. 3: Andante Con Moto 3:34
2. Symphony No. 3: Allegro Con Brio 10:27
3. Symphony No. 3: Adagio 12:40
4. Symphony No. 3: Passacaglia - Allegro Moderato 6:46
5. Symphony No. 3: Vivace 10:52
6. Threnody For The Victims Of Hiroshima For 52 Stringed Instruments 8:55
7. Fluorescenses For Orchestra 14:51
8. De Natura Sonoris II For Orchestra 8:58

Details

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The first of two volumes documenting various orchestral works of Penderecki, this captures him at arguably the most fascinating point in his career, where the sheer experimentalism of his early years was being melded into structures that were almost traditional and even romantic in nature. One highlight is a wild and woolly Cello Concerto, with Siegfried Palm in the spotlight navigating a virtuosic piece that's virtually an avant-garde version of something that might have been written for Paganini. Palm launches into the work with ferocity and abandon, the orchestra (replete with saxophones, a harmonium, and an electric guitar) bellowing and rumbling in pitched battle. De Natura Sonoris No. 2 is equally impressive, though in a much more somber vein. As the title implies, it's a pure exploration of sound, a shifting textural fabric ranging from a keening duo section for bird whistle and bowed saw to an extraordinarily dense cacophony of low brass and strident percussion (including hammered train rail!) that ultimately exhausts itself into a series of plaintive moans. The remaining two compositions, if less immediately overwhelming, are also fine, haunting works, Kanon especially emphasizing Penderecki's slashing writing for string orchestra combined with additional taped string music, again producing a sonic thickness rarely heard in contemporary classical music. Unavailable on disc as of 2002, this album, along with its companion volume, is an essential document of Penderecki's career.