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KT Tunstall's Acoustic Extravaganza


Download links and information about KT Tunstall's Acoustic Extravaganza by Kt Tunstall. This album was released in 2006 and it belongs to Rock, Folk Rock, Pop, Alternative, Songwriter/Lyricist genres. It contains 10 tracks with total duration of 43:15 minutes.

Artist: Kt Tunstall
Release date: 2006
Genre: Rock, Folk Rock, Pop, Alternative, Songwriter/Lyricist
Tracks: 10
Duration: 43:15
Buy on iTunes $9.99
Buy on Amazon $9.49


No. Title Length
1. Ashes 3:34
2. Girl and the Ghost 4:14
3. One Day 5:02
4. Golden Age 5:00
5. Boo Hoo 4:56
6. Gone to the Dogs 3:59
7. Change 3:44
8. Miniature Disasters 4:32
9. Universe & U 4:31
10. Throw Me a Rope 3:43



The very worst that can be said about Acoustic Extravaganza is that it is a stopgap between Eye to the Telescope, which was actually released in the U.K. in late 2005, and whatever comes next. Recorded after a relentless touring schedule, the tracks here were done in a small, remote Scottish studio with KT Tunstall's band. The set includes acoustic versions of "Universe & U" and "Miniature Disasters" from the album, and a few cuts, such as "Girl & the Ghost," "Throw Me a Rope," and "One Day," which were employed as B-sides for singles. There's also a fine — no, nearly stunning — cover of Beck's "Golden Age," which could have been recorded for a Ronnie Lane solo album. The rest, such as the countrified "Ashes" with its bold lyrics, the bluesy ballad "Boo Hoo," the pastoral folk-country of "Gone to the Dogs," and the minor key shimmering snapshot "Change" are all first-rate. The relaxed feel of the album is, in its way, a different side of the coin from Eye to the Telescope. Without all the production and gloss, Tunstall is still smooth, and tough at the same time. The DVD that comes along with this set contains a documentary on the making of the album — this one — videos for "Gone to the Dogs," "Throw Me a Rope," and a little ditty called the "Wee Bastard Pedal." There are also a slew of photos and outtakes. In other words, this is not a simple capitalistic attempt to part you from your hard-earned cash, but more the artist reaching out to fans she didn't even know she had a year ago, and offering something intimate, gentle, fun, and worthy to make the wait easier. Remember: she's as eager to keep you as you are restless for the next installment. If anything, this little "in process" package reveals the fact that — in the over-saturated American pop culture market — Eye to the Telescope was no fluke. Tunstall's the real artifact.