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Re-Entry

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Download links and information about Re-Entry by Marley Marl. This album was released in 2001 and it belongs to Hip Hop/R&B, Rap, Rock genres. It contains 16 tracks with total duration of 56:09 minutes.

Artist: Marley Marl
Release date: 2001
Genre: Hip Hop/R&B, Rap, Rock
Tracks: 16
Duration: 56:09
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Tracks

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No. Title Length
1. Intro 0:59
2. Do U Remember 1:18
3. Three's Company 4:20
4. Spazz 4:28
5. Just Funky 4:13
6. Who's Sicker 3:55
7. Lost Beat 3:45
8. Easy Type S**t 5:25
9. Live Ova Beats 2:10
10. Foundation Symphony 3:29
11. So Good 3:14
12. Hummin' 5:08
13. Big Faces 2:43
14. What Ruling Means 4:45
15. What U Hold Down 3:53
16. NY, NY 2:24

Details

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At 39 years of age, veteran rap producer Marley Marl's return to recording came as part of the London-based BBE (Barely Breaking Even) label's Beat Generation series. The series was an attempt to reclaim hip-hop from the clutches of overexposure. While Marl hadn't really recorded a true full-length album since his In Control, Vol. 2 in 1991, he remained a fixture in the hip-hop community (and influence on producers like Pete Rock and Jay Dee), producing tracks throughout the '90s for artists such as Capone-N-Noreaga, Rakim, and K Def & Larry O. Marl was directly responsible for putting together the Juice Crew, one of hip-hop's all-time elite teams that included the likes of Roxanne Shante, MC Shan, Big Daddy Kane, Masta Ace, and Biz Markie. The Juice Crew's late-'80s battle for rap supremacy with KRS-One and Boogie Down Productions remains one of the most compelling legends of rap lore. Re-Entry's against-the-grain format just might have won over a few young undergrounders, but it is not extraordinary by any stretch. One would have thought that a super-producer of Marl's caliber would fetch a number of name MCs; this is unfortunately not the case, with the exception of Big Daddy Kane, Capone, and a couple of talented undergrounders. Some of the old Marl magic does resurface on the thuggish "What U Hold Down," and the maestro even branches out on the jazz-funk exploration "Hummin'," which features hip-hop forefather Roy Ayers. Many of the cuts here are just instrumentals that surely smack of filler, but Re-Entry certainly has its moments — moments that might just have some listeners reminiscing back to the Juice Crew era. ~ M.F. DiBella, Rovi