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Bare Back Rider

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Download links and information about Bare Back Rider by Mason Proffit. This album was released in 1973 and it belongs to Rock, Folk Rock, Country, Songwriter/Lyricist, Psychedelic genres. It contains 10 tracks with total duration of 37:04 minutes.

Artist: Mason Proffit
Release date: 1973
Genre: Rock, Folk Rock, Country, Songwriter/Lyricist, Psychedelic
Tracks: 10
Duration: 37:04
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Tracks

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No. Title Length
1. Lilly 2:19
2. Cottonwood 4:17
3. Setting the Woods On Fire 2:56
4. Dance Hall Fire 4:50
5. To a Friend 4:12
6. Stoney River 3:50
7. Black September - Belfast 3:47
8. I Saw the Light 2:58
9. Five Generations 4:44
10. Sail Away 3:11

Details

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Mason Proffit's second major-label album and fifth album overall was similar in construction to its predecessor, Rockfish Crossing. Once again, the Talbot brothers and their supporting players turned in a combination of effective originals that touched on subjects from romance to politics with some enthusiastically performed country covers, notably a version of "Setting the Woods on Fire" that sounded like a deliberate attempt to impersonate Jerry Lee Lewis and featured a furious kazoo solo. The political element came out in "Black September/Belfast," with its reflections on Northern Ireland and Vietnam. You'd have thought that music this impressive could get a hearing, but Mason Proffit appeared at a time when music fans were more polarized than musicians, not only by music but by politics and culture. Despite the band's evident affection for traditional country music, their left-wing political stance and status as hippie rock musicians meant they could never be accepted in Nashville. And their music was too overtly country for them to score a pop hit. Thus, they were doomed to appeal only on the country-rock-oriented Los Angeles club scene and to some music critics. Bare Back Rider did a little better than Rockfish Crossing had, even scraping into the charts for a couple of weeks, but that wasn't the level of success a major label expected, and Mason Proffit was forced to hang up its spurs.