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Double Nickels On the Dime


Download links and information about Double Nickels On the Dime by Minutemen. This album was released in 1984 and it belongs to Rock, Indie Rock, Punk, Alternative genres. It contains 43 tracks with total duration of 01:14:17 minutes.

Artist: Minutemen
Release date: 1984
Genre: Rock, Indie Rock, Punk, Alternative
Tracks: 43
Duration: 01:14:17
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No. Title Length
1. D.'s Car Jam / Anxious Mo-Fo 1:20
2. Theatre Is the Life of You 1:30
3. Viet Nam 1:29
4. Cohesion 1:56
5. It's Expected I'm Gone 2:05
6. #1 Hit Song 1:49
7. Two Beads At the End 1:53
8. Do You Want New Wave or Do You Want the Truth 1:50
9. Don't Look Now 1:47
10. S**t from an Old Notebook 1:36
11. Nature Without Man 1:46
12. One Reporters Opinion 1:51
13. Political Song for Michael Jackson to Sing 1:31
14. Maybe Partying Will Help 1:56
15. Toadies 1:38
16. Retreat 2:00
17. The Big Foist 1:30
18. God Bows to Math 1:16
19. Corona 2:25
20. The Glory of Man 2:57
21. Take 5, D. 1:39
22. My Heart and the Real World 1:06
23. History Lesson Part 2 2:12
24. You Need the Glory 2:03
25. The Roar of the Masses Could Be Farts 1:21
26. West Germany 1:49
27. The Politics of Time 1:12
28. Themselves 1:18
29. Please Don't Be Gentle With Me 0:47
30. Nothing Indeed 1:22
31. No Exchange 1:51
32. There Ain't S**t On T.V. Tonight 1:34
33. This Ain't No Picnic 1:57
34. Spillage 1:53
35. Untitled Song for Latin America 2:03
36. Jesus and Tequila 2:53
37. June 16th 1:49
38. Storm In My House 1:59
39. Martin's Story 0:52
40. Dr. Wu 1:45
41. The World According to Nouns 2:07
42. Love Dance 2:02
43. Three Car Jam 0:38



Double Nickels on the Dime serves as an affirmation of punk rock liberty from a band that believed in it more than any other. Spread over two records and a staggering 44 songs, the album’s girth spoofed the seventies excesses of Peter Frampton and Yes, yet it was also a verification of the band’s creative stamina. There was no reason for these blue collar “corndogs” to think they could indulge in the rock god fantasies of Frampton or Kiss, yet the Minutemen lit every inch of their double-wide opus with off-kilter imagination. For a band that thrived by attempting the unexpected, Double Nickels continued to thwart anyone’s ability to categorize the Minutemen. Anxious outbursts fall next to free-form guitar noodling, and as soon as you think you have the band’s agitprop agenda pinned down, they will completely disarm you with gentle, forlorn strumming on “Cohesion” and “History Lesson Part 2.” With its outlandish plays on political sloganeering, Double Nickels indulged the group’s love for leftist rabble-rousing, yet they spurned self-righteousness. They embraced their roots as working class everymen from the port town of San Pedro, California, and their emotions — confusion, frustration, nostalgia, humorousness — feel genuine. No band believed in sincerity as much as the Minutemen, and it is the undercurrent of earnestness that makes Double Nickels a heroic work.