Create account Log in

Blues Forever

[Edit]

Download links and information about Blues Forever by Muhal Richard Abrams. This album was released in 1982 and it belongs to Jazz, Avant Garde Jazz, Avant Garde Metal genres. It contains 7 tracks with total duration of 42:36 minutes.

Artist: Muhal Richard Abrams
Release date: 1982
Genre: Jazz, Avant Garde Jazz, Avant Garde Metal
Tracks: 7
Duration: 42:36
Buy on iTunes $6.93
Buy on Amazon $6.23
Buy on Music Bazaar €1.20

Tracks

[Edit]
No. Title Length
1. Ancient and Future Reflections (featuring Jean - Paul Bourelly, Howard Johnson, Michael Logan, Baikida Carroll, Craig Harris, Andrew Cyrille, Wallace McMillan, Vincent Chancey, Eugene Ghee) 6:50
2. King (dedicated to Duke Ellington) (featuring Jean - Paul Bourelly, Howard Johnson, Michael Logan, Baikida Carroll, Craig Harris, Andrew Cyrille, Wallace McMillan, Vincent Chancey, Eugene Ghee) 2:02
3. Chambea (featuring Jean - Paul Bourelly, Howard Johnson, Michael Logan, Baikida Carroll, Craig Harris, Andrew Cyrille, Wallace McMillan, Vincent Chancey, Eugene Ghee) 7:32
4. Duet for One World (featuring Jean - Paul Bourelly, Howard Johnson, Michael Logan, Baikida Carroll, Craig Harris, Andrew Cyrille, Wallace McMillan, Vincent Chancey, Eugene Ghee) 4:56
5. Blues Forever (featuring Jean - Paul Bourelly, Howard Johnson, Michael Logan, Baikida Carroll, Craig Harris, Andrew Cyrille, Wallace McMillan, Vincent Chancey, Eugene Ghee) 9:04
6. Cluster for Many Worlds (featuring Jean - Paul Bourelly, Howard Johnson, Michael Logan, Baikida Carroll, Craig Harris, Andrew Cyrille, Wallace McMillan, Vincent Chancey, Eugene Ghee) 5:04
7. Quartet to Quartet (featuring Jean - Paul Bourelly, Howard Johnson, Michael Logan, Baikida Carroll, Craig Harris, Andrew Cyrille, Wallace McMillan, Vincent Chancey, Eugene Ghee) 7:08

Details

[Edit]

Tremendous large orchestra session, with Abrams heading a crew that includes the cream of '70s and '80s improvisers, plus some '60s survivors. Although every arrangement doesn't click, the band successfully romps and stomps through enough cuts to show that the big band sound doesn't just mean "ghost" groups recreating dusty numbers from the '30s and '40s.