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Gold: The Allman Brothers Band


Download links and information about Gold: The Allman Brothers Band by Nusrat Fateh Ali Khan. This album was released in 1969 and it belongs to Blues, Rock, Blues Rock, Hard Rock, Rock & Roll, Heavy Metal genres. It contains 30 tracks with total duration of 02:31:08 minutes.

Artist: Nusrat Fateh Ali Khan
Release date: 1969
Genre: Blues, Rock, Blues Rock, Hard Rock, Rock & Roll, Heavy Metal
Tracks: 30
Duration: 02:31:08
Buy on iTunes $15.99


No. Title Length
1. Don't Want You No More 2:25
2. It's Not My Cross to Bear 4:55
3. Black Hearted Woman 5:16
4. Trouble No More (Live At the Fillmore East) 3:46
5. Dreams 7:17
6. Whipping Post 5:20
7. Revival 4:03
8. Midnight Rider 2:58
9. Don't Keep Me Wonderin' 3:28
10. Hoochie Coochie Man 4:54
11. Statesboro Blues 4:18
12. Stormy Monday (Live At the Fillmore East) 8:48
13. Hot 'Lanta (Live At the Fillmore East) 5:20
14. In Memory of Elizabeth Reed (Live At the Fillmore East) 13:05
15. One Way Out (Live) 4:57
16. Ain't Wastin Time No More (Live) 3:40
17. Melissa 3:51
18. Stand Back 3:24
19. Blue Sky 5:09
20. Little Martha 2:08
21. Wasted Words 4:18
22. Ramblin' Man 4:48
23. Southbound 5:10
24. Jessica (Unedited Master Version) 7:29
25. Come and Go Blues (Live) 4:59
26. Can't Lose What You Never Had (Live) 5:50
27. Win, Lose or Draw 4:44
28. Crazy Love 3:43
29. Can't Take It With You 3:34
30. Pegasus 7:31



Outside of the hefty box set Dreams, the double-length Gold anthology is as comprehensive a collection of Allman Brothers Band gems from the group's initial run (1969-1979) as you'll find. Naturally, Gold is heavy on material from the albums that included guitar hero Duane Allman, including the seminal live record At Fillmore East. Hearing the sparks that fly between him and his guitar-slinging compadre Dickey Betts is a timeless thrill, whether the band are simmering on the jazz fusion-inflected instrumental "In Memory of Elizabeth Reed" or burning up Blind Willie McTell's "Statesboro Blues." Greg Allman's gritty, soulful voice made him one of his generation's most effective blues interpreters, but he could also turn out sophisticated tunes like "Whipping Post," probably the only classic rock staple in 11/4 time. But the albums following Duane's death are well represented too, and we hear Betts come to the fore on his own compositions, like the sunny, country-flavored instrumental "Jessica" and the twangy, upbeat open-road ode "Ramblin' Man."