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Martin Scorsese Presents the Blues: The Allman Brothers Band

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Download links and information about Martin Scorsese Presents the Blues: The Allman Brothers Band by Nusrat Fateh Ali Khan. This album was released in 2003 and it belongs to Blues, Rock, Blues Rock, Hard Rock, Rock & Roll, Heavy Metal genres. It contains 11 tracks with total duration of 01:14:05 minutes.

Artist: Nusrat Fateh Ali Khan
Release date: 2003
Genre: Blues, Rock, Blues Rock, Hard Rock, Rock & Roll, Heavy Metal
Tracks: 11
Duration: 01:14:05
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Tracks

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No. Title Length
1. Trouble No More 3:45
2. Done Somebody Wrong (Live) 4:14
3. Stormy Monday (Live) 8:47
4. Can't Lose What You Never Had 5:49
5. Statesboro Blues 4:11
6. One Way Out (Live) 4:55
7. Hoochie Coochie Man 4:54
8. I'm Gonna Move to the Outskirts of Town (Live) 9:16
9. Dimples (Live) 4:56
10. Need Your Love So Bad 4:01
11. You Don't Love Me (Live) 19:17

Details

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As any fan knows — heck, as anyone who's listened to the radio since 1970 knows — there was much more to the Allman Brothers Band than blues. Blues-rock, however, was a foundation of their music, and that's what you'll hear on this compilation, which is part of the Martin Scorsese Presents the Blues CD series, issued in conjunction with the television documentary series The Blues. As is proper, almost all of this is from the band's early years; all but two of the songs were recorded between September 1969 and June 1971, and none of them postdate 1979. So the accent falls very heavily on their Southern rockified covers of blues songs by Elmore James, T-Bone Walker, Muddy Waters, Blind Willie McTell, and Sonny Boy Williamson, including tunes that were among the group's most popular, among them "Trouble No More," "Statesboro Blues," "One Way Out," "You Don't Love Me," and "Dimples." That means there's no room for the considerable chunk of their repertoire that also mixed in pop, straight-ahead hard rock, jazz, and country, like "Dreams," "Ramblin' Man," "Whipping Post," and "In Memory of Elizabeth Reed." But if you are in the mood for the blues and the blues only, this is certainly a good (and long, running 74 minutes) sampler of the sounds that made them the most esteemed American blues-rock interpreters.