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We Free Kings

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Download links and information about We Free Kings by Roland Kirk. This album was released in 1961 and it belongs to Jazz genres. It contains 10 tracks with total duration of 43:06 minutes.

Artist: Roland Kirk
Release date: 1961
Genre: Jazz
Tracks: 10
Duration: 43:06
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Tracks

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No. Title Length
1. Three for the Festival (featuring Roland Kirk Quartet, Rahsaan Roland Kirk Quartet) 3:10
2. Moon Song (featuring Roland Kirk Quartet, Rahsaan Roland Kirk Quartet) 4:23
3. A Sack Full of Soul (featuring Roland Kirk Quartet, Rahsaan Roland Kirk Quartet) 4:40
4. The Haunted Melody (featuring Roland Kirk Quartet, Rahsaan Roland Kirk Quartet) 3:38
5. Blues for Alice (Alternate Take) (featuring Roland Kirk Quartet, Rahsaan Roland Kirk Quartet) 5:13
6. Blues for Alice (featuring Roland Kirk Quartet, Rahsaan Roland Kirk Quartet) 4:08
7. We Free Kings (featuring Roland Kirk Quartet, Rahsaan Roland Kirk Quartet) 4:46
8. You Did It You Did It (featuring Roland Kirk Quartet, Rahsaan Roland Kirk Quartet) 2:29
9. Some Kind of Love (featuring Roland Kirk Quartet, Rahsaan Roland Kirk Quartet) 6:11
10. My Delight (featuring Roland Kirk Quartet, Rahsaan Roland Kirk Quartet) 4:28

Details

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Rahsaan Roland Kirk’s first album for Mercury opened one of the most glorious chapters in the reedman’s celebrated career. The cover features a lush color photo of Kirk with multiple horns draped around his neck, and his unison playing is displayed right out the gate on “Three For the Festival.” The song is a tour-de-force, as Kirk blows the chorus on multiple horns and takes a terrific solo turn on flute. The full-bodied flute playing highlights Kirk’s essence: breath is the life-force of all humans, and Kirk used it to its fullest potential. His solos on “Blues For Alice” and “A Sack Full of Soul” are agile and gutsy, two qualities that are rarely married in one saxophonist. More crucially, Kirk has a way of pushing his soul through the horn and into the consciousness of the listener. Most horn players might rattle the leaves — Kirk shakes the whole tree. His dual sense of playfulness and passion comes alive on the title track, a reworking of the 19th century Christmas carol — a bold reinvention undoubtedly inspired by John Coltrane’s “My Favorite Things,” released just a few months before the recording of this album.