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Exile On Main St. (Deluxe Edition)

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Download links and information about Exile On Main St. (Deluxe Edition) by Rolling Stones. This album was released in 2010 and it belongs to Rock, Blues Rock, Hard Rock, Rock & Roll, Heavy Metal, Pop genres. It contains 30 tracks with total duration of 01:56:10 minutes.

Artist: Rolling Stones
Release date: 2010
Genre: Rock, Blues Rock, Hard Rock, Rock & Roll, Heavy Metal, Pop
Tracks: 30
Duration: 01:56:10
Buy on iTunes $19.99

Tracks

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No. Title Length
1. Rocks Off 4:32
2. Rip This Joint 2:23
3. Shake Your Hips 2:59
4. Casino Boogie 3:34
5. Tumbling Dice 3:47
6. Sweet Virginia 4:26
7. Torn and Frayed 4:18
8. Sweet Black Angel 2:58
9. Loving Cup 4:25
10. Happy 3:04
11. Turd On the Run 2:38
12. Ventilator Blues 3:24
13. I Just Want to See His Face 2:53
14. Let It Loose 5:18
15. All Down the Line 3:50
16. Stop Breaking Down 4:34
17. Shine a Light 4:16
18. Soul Survivor 3:48
19. Pass the Wine (Sophia Loren) 4:54
20. Plundered My Soul 3:58
21. I'm Not Signifying 3:56
22. Following the River 4:51
23. Dancing In the Light 4:21
24. So Divine (Aladdin Story) 4:32
25. Loving Cup (Alternate Version) 5:26
26. Soul Survivor (Alternate Version) 3:59
27. Good Time Women 3:21
28. Title 5 1:47
29. Plundered My Soul (Stones In Exile) 4:00
30. Plundered My Soul 3:58

Details

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In many ways the archetypical rock record, 1972's rambling double album Exile on Main Street shows the Stones at their least pretentious and least calculated. Their boozy, dingy, boogie-heavy blend of rock, country, blues, R&B, and gospel was never more powerful or instinctive. Recorded at Keith Richards's house in France, the album feels like a messy, muddy hodge-podge of musical ideas, but the truth is that each of the 18 songs has something noteworthy to offer. "Rip This Joint," complete with wailing sock-hop sax, might be the most feverish track they've ever recorded, and "Rocks Off" and "All Down the Line" are vintage rollicking Stones, but their forays into Southern soul (the single "Tumbling Dice," "Loving Cup," "Let It Loose"), gospel "Shine a Light," honky-tonk "Sweet Virginia," and electric blues "Stop Breaking Down" are each handled with tossed-off charm. The primal and puzzling "I Just Want to See His Face" stands as one of the band's most intriguing tracks. This is pure, unadulterated, unhyphenated rock — its patchwork feel and ragged, tattered setting only add to its magnetism.