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Mars Audiac Quintet

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Download links and information about Mars Audiac Quintet by Stereolab. This album was released in 1994 and it belongs to Electronica, Jazz, Rock, Indie Rock, Pop, Alternative genres. It contains 15 tracks with total duration of 01:06:55 minutes.

Artist: Stereolab
Release date: 1994
Genre: Electronica, Jazz, Rock, Indie Rock, Pop, Alternative
Tracks: 15
Duration: 01:06:55
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Tracks

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No. Title Length
1. Three-Dee Melodie 5:02
2. Wow and Flutter 3:08
3. Transona Five 5:32
4. Des Étoiles Électroniques 3:19
5. Ping Pong 3:02
6. Anamorphose 7:33
7. Three Longers Later 3:28
8. Nihilist Assault Group 6:54
9. International Colouring Contest 3:47
10. The Stars Our Destination 2:58
11. Transporte Sans Bouger 4:20
12. L'enfer Des Formes 3:53
13. Outer Accelerator 5:21
14. New Orthophony 4:34
15. Fiery Yellow 4:04

Details

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By the time of 1994's Mars Audiac Quintet, Stereolab had already highlighted the rock and experimental sides of its music; now the band concentrated on perfecting its space-age pop. Sweetly bouncy songs like "Ping Pong" and "L' Enfer des Formes" streamline the band's sound without sacrificing its essence; track for track, this may be the group's most accessible, tightly written album. The groove-driven "Outer Accelerator," "Wow and Flutter," and "Transona Five" (which sounds strangely like Canned Heat's "Goin' Up the Country") reaffirm Stereolab's Krautrock roots, but the band's sweet synth melodies and vocal arrangements give it a pop patina. Even extended pieces like "Anamorphose" and "Nihilist Assault Group" — which could have appeared on Transient Random Noise-Bursts With Announcements if they had a rawer production — are more sensual and voluptuous than edgy and challenging. It's equally apparent on layered, complex songs such as "New Orthophony" and "The Stars Our Destination," as well as spare, minimal tracks like "Des Etoiles Electroniques," that the members of Stereolab focused their experimental energies on production tricks, vocal interplay, and increasingly electronic-based arrangements. The charming final track "Fiery Yellow" takes the band's fondness for lounge pop and experimentation to the limit; a delicate, marimba-driven piece featuring the High Llamas' Sean O'Hagan, it sounds like the kind of music Esquivel or Martin Denny would be proud to make in the '90s. While it's not as overtly innovative as some of Stereolab's earlier albums, Mars Audiac Quintet is an enjoyable, accessible forerunner to the intricate, cerebral direction the group's music would take in the mid- and late '90s.