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Peng!

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Download links and information about Peng! by Stereolab. This album was released in 1992 and it belongs to Electronica, Jazz, Rock, Indie Rock, Pop, Alternative genres. It contains 11 tracks with total duration of 47:49 minutes.

Artist: Stereolab
Release date: 1992
Genre: Electronica, Jazz, Rock, Indie Rock, Pop, Alternative
Tracks: 11
Duration: 47:49
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Tracks

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No. Title Length
1. Super Falling Star 3:16
2. Orgiastic 4:44
3. Peng! 33 3:03
4. K-stars 4:04
5. Perversion 5:01
6. You Little S***s 3:25
7. The Seeming and the Meaning 3:48
8. Mellotron 2:47
9. Enivrez-vous 3:51
10. Stomach Worm 6:35
11. Surrealchemist 7:15

Details

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With its full-length debut Peng!, Stereolab continued to develop a unique approach to experimental pop music, building on the seriously playful mix of Krautrock, dream pop, and lounge forged on the band's early singles. The album's first three tracks present the basic kinds of songs that the band would explore in the future: the tense, brooding "Super Falling Star" builds on simple keyboard drones and chilly, choral vocals; "Orgiastic" is a prototypically chugging, droning guitar and keyboard workout; and the sweet, bouncy melody and "ba ba ba" backing vocals of "Peng! 33" define Stereolab's early pop sound. "Perversion" mixes a heavy, dance-inspired beat with strummy, Velvet Underground guitars and Beach Boys harmonies, while "The Seeming and the Meaning" and "Stomach Worm" are two of the band's most dynamic, rock-oriented songs. Dreamy, melancholy songs like "K-Stars" and "You Little S***s" and the fuzzed-out "Mellotron" and "Enivrez-Vous" represent, respectively, the soft and loud aspects of Stereolab's more experimental side, and "Surrealchemist" manages to combine all of the aspects of the group's sound, with overtly Marxist lyrics to boot. While Peng! doesn't feature many of Stereolab's most instantly recognizable compositions, it defines the group's early style and reflects the eclectic directions pursued in later work.