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Blood, Sweat & No Tears

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Download links and information about Blood, Sweat & No Tears by Stetsasonic. This album was released in 1991 and it belongs to Hip Hop/R&B, Rap genres. It contains 17 tracks with total duration of 01:09:01 minutes.

Artist: Stetsasonic
Release date: 1991
Genre: Hip Hop/R&B, Rap
Tracks: 17
Duration: 01:09:01
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Tracks

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No. Title Length
1. The Hip Hop Band 2:29
2. No B.S. Allowed 4:30
3. Uda Man 5:02
4. Speaking of a Girl Named Suzy 5:25
5. Gyrlz 5:34
6. Blood, Sweat & No Tears 2:47
7. So Let the Fun Begin 4:53
8. Go Brooklyn 3 3:54
9. Walkin In the Rain 5:45
10. Don't Let Your Mouth Write a Check That Your Ass Can't Cash 5:24
11. Ghetto Is the World 5:54
12. Your Mother Has Green Teeth 2:15
13. You Still Smokin' That S**t 0:46
14. Heaven Help the M.F.'s 4:38
15. Took Place In East N.Y. 2:36
16. Paul's a Sucker 3:58
17. Free South Africa (The Remix) 3:11

Details

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When Stetsasonic convened to record what would become their final album, the group were already starting to splinter. Founding member Frukwan had already left, and producer Prince Paul was consumed by his groundbreaking collaboration with De La Soul. Because Blood, Sweat & No Tears lacked the focus and cohesion of the first two Stetsasonic albums, the album was widely dismissed by the hip-hop establishment. However, in retrospect it's easier to appreciate it as an assemblage of individual songs, many of which are similar in mindset to the prodigious work that De La Soul were doing around the same time. “No B.S. Allowed,” “Speaking of a Girl,” and “Go Brooklyn 3” could have fit easily on De La Soul Is Dead, and the incomparable Daddy-O delivers his raps with a teenager’s unbound vigor. Even playful fragments like “Your Mother Has Green Teeth” and “You Still Smokin’ That S**t” feel more like little prizes than throwaways. Though the rap culture that had birthed them was rapidly changing, Stetsasonic’s creativity never lagged. Their last hurrah embodies the stylistic diversity that had always been the collective's primary goal.