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All Our Own Work

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Download links and information about All Our Own Work by Sandy Denny, Strawbs. This album was released in 1967 and it belongs to Rock, Folk Rock, World Music, Songwriter/Lyricist, Psychedelic genres. It contains 24 tracks with total duration of 01:04:31 minutes.

Artist: Sandy Denny, Strawbs
Release date: 1967
Genre: Rock, Folk Rock, World Music, Songwriter/Lyricist, Psychedelic
Tracks: 24
Duration: 01:04:31
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Tracks

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No. Title Length
1. On My Way 3:03
2. Who Knows Where the Time Goes 4:03
3. Tell Me What You See in Me 3:38
4. Always on My Mind 1:50
5. Stay Awhile with Me 2:23
6. Wild Strawberries 1:31
7. All I Need Is You Babe 2:18
8. How Everyone But Sam Was a Hypocrite 2:43
9. Sail Away to the Sea 3:21
10. Sweetling 2:33
11. Nothing Else Will do Babe (Dave Cousins lead vocal) 2:13
12. And You Need Me 3:13
13. Two Weeks Last Summer 2:16
14. Nothing Else Will do Babe (Sandy Denny lead vocal) 2:21
15. Tell Me What You See in Me (Alternative take) 3:36
16. Who Knows Where the Time Goes (with strings) 4:05
17. Stay Awhile with Me (with strings) 2:23
18. And You Need Me (with strings) 3:15
19. I've Been My Own Worst Friend 2:37
20. Poor Jimmy Wilson 2:31
21. Strawberry Picking 1:34
22. Pieces of 79 And 15 2:18
23. The Falling Leaves 2:29
24. Indian Summer 2:17

Details

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Sandy Denny started her career with the English group The Strawbs, a mercurial outfit that in the '60s were going for something akin to Peter, Paul & Mary. All the recordings from this short-lived phase are collected on All Our Own Work; the contents were recorded in Denmark in 1967, when Denny was 20. It’s possible that these recordings went unreleased because they were a few years late for the folk-rock trend, but “On My Way” and “All I Need Is You Babe” are sterling pop songs equal to anything by The Byrds or The Beau Brummels. For most listeners, though, the real attraction is witnessing the emergence of Denny’s musical identity. Though she hadn’t yet joined Fairport Convention, “Tell Me What You See in Me” and “Sail Away to the Sea” presage her work with that group, with whom she’d develop her singular take on Scotch-Irish balladry. Though the collection is full of treasure, two early versions of Denny’s “Who Knows Where the Time Goes” tower above the rest of the material.