Create account Log in

Diamond Hoo Ha

[Edit]

Download links and information about Diamond Hoo Ha by Supergrass. This album was released in 2008 and it belongs to Rock, Pop, Alternative genres. It contains 13 tracks with total duration of 47:17 minutes.

Artist: Supergrass
Release date: 2008
Genre: Rock, Pop, Alternative
Tracks: 13
Duration: 47:17
Buy on iTunes $9.99
Buy on Amazon $9.49
Buy on Amazon $9.49

Tracks

[Edit]
No. Title Length
1. Diamond Hoo Ha Man 3:26
2. Bad Blood 3:03
3. Rebel In You 4:41
4. When I Needed You 2:31
5. 345 3:39
6. The Return Of ... 3:35
7. Rough Knuckles 3:24
8. Ghost of a Friend 3:54
9. Whiskey & Green Tea 4:16
10. Outside 3:32
11. Butterfly 5:09
12. Bad Blood (Live In London) (featuring Diamond Hoo Ha Men) 3:12
13. Rough Knuckles (Live In London) (featuring Diamond Hoo Ha Men) 2:55

Details

[Edit]

After spending a dark, contemplative night on the Road to Rouen, Supergrass come crashing back to life with Diamond Hoo Ha, an album every bit as cheerfully gaudy and vulgar as its title. It all begins, as it should, with "Diamond Hoo Hah Man," a wicked send-up of the White Stripes' gonzo thump that rivals "Blue Orchid" and "Icky Thump" in its outsized swagger, while providing the touchstone for the rest of the record, not so much in its sound but in its attitude. Not that Supergrass doesn't crank the guitars here, as they offer up the stomping Stooges shuffle of "Bad Blood" and spangly "Rebel in You" in quick succession, but after this furious opening triptych, the band widens their net and lightens their touch, reconnecting with their signature impish humor that was quite deliberately missing on much of Road to Rouen despite its punning title. At times they actually overplay their mischief, overloading "Whiskey and Green Tea" with too much stylized British whimsy, it threatens to topple over on the weight of its braying brass. This isn't the only time that the band doesn't seem to fully have their urges under control, as there are a few pop tunes toward the end of the record that don't quite click as their hooks aren't finely honed. This is how Diamond Hoo Ha differs from 2002's incandescent Life on Other Planets which offered song after song that effortlessly dazzled. Here, Supergrass seem to labor a little to achieve such high times...but only toward the end of the record, which is solid and well-crafted but lacking the glorious, giddy highs the band offers at the beginning. However, that first half — somewhat ironically ending after the jazzy soft rock sheen of "Return of Inspiration" — holds its own with the best of Supergrass, filled with mammoth melodies and unbridled fun. It's more than enough to make Diamond Hoo Ha worth hearing, and it's just enough to illustrate the difference (and the merits) between inspiration and craft.