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Twenty Twenty: The Essential T Bone Burnett


Download links and information about Twenty Twenty: The Essential T Bone Burnett by T - Bone Burnett. This album was released in 2006 and it belongs to Rock, Folk Rock, Alternative, Songwriter/Lyricist, Psychedelic genres. It contains 40 tracks with total duration of 02:28:08 minutes.

Artist: T - Bone Burnett
Release date: 2006
Genre: Rock, Folk Rock, Alternative, Songwriter/Lyricist, Psychedelic
Tracks: 40
Duration: 02:28:08
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No. Title Length
1. Humans from Earth 2:47
2. Born In Captivity 4:06
3. Primitives 3:14
4. Power of Love 2:55
5. Fatally Beautiful 4:33
6. Monkey Dance 4:25
7. The Long Time Now 2:59
8. River of Love 3:34
9. Shut It Tight 2:56
10. Tear This Building Down 4:35
11. The Murder Weapon 5:14
12. Image 4:02
13. Kill Zone 4:05
14. Hula Hoop 3:25
15. Criminals 3:44
16. Diamonds Are a Girl's Best Friend 3:04
17. No Love At All 2:57
18. When The Night Falls 4:23
19. Over You 2:21
20. The Bird That I Held In My Hand 3:10
21. Every Little Thing 2:54
22. House of Mirrors 3:34
23. The Dogs 4:21
24. Shake Yourself Loose 3:04
25. Kill Switch 2:56
26. I Wish You Could Have Seen Her Dance 3:48
27. Hefner and Disney 3:53
28. Drivin Wheel 3:13
29. Boomerang 4:19
30. Euromad 4:12
31. Strange Combination 3:50
32. East Of East 3:11
33. The People's Limousine 3:41
34. Trap Door 4:11
35. I'm Coming Home 4:02
36. It's Not Too Late 4:27
37. Song to a Dead Man 4:09
38. After All These Years 3:12
39. Man, Don't Dog Your Woman 3:44
40. Bon Temps Rouler 4:58



T-Bone Burnett is an artist whose reputation among critics, fellow musicians, and discerning record-buyers has cast a far longer shadow than his visibility among casual listeners for the better part of four decades. As a lyricist, Burnett has few peers; his sharply etched, intelligently witty, and very human meditations on love (both romantic and divine), compassion, corruption, and greed in our culture dig deeper than most other writers of his generation, but roll gracefully off the tongue with a grace that never quite belies their philosophical heft. Burnett's musical instincts are as sure as his lyrical sensibility (the fact Pete Townshend, Richard Thompson, David Hidalgo, Jim Keltner, Mick Ronson, Marc Ribot, and some guy called Bono have all guested on his records suggests he's well regarded by folks who know), and his gifts as a producer are such that he managed to turn bluegrass into a 21th century cultural phenomenon with the soundtrack to O Brother, Where Art Thou? Simply stated, this man deserves a wider audience, and Twenty Twenty: The Essential T-Bone Burnett is a compilation assembled with Burnett's participation designed to provide a one-stop introduction to his music. This is a noble enough idea, and there's no shortage of superb music included on this package — 40 songs and nearly two and a half hours of music are crammed onto two CDs, with a thick accompanying booklet featuring a gushing profile from writer Bill Flanagan and notes on each tune from Burnett himself. The set is admirably comprehensive, featuring cuts from two of the three hard to find albums Burnett made with the Alpha Band in the mid-'70s, excellent selections from the five albums and two EPs he released between 1980 and 1992, and three unreleased cuts. (Completists will, of course, grumble that he chose not to include anything from his misbegotten debut album, 1972's The B-52 Band & the Fabulous Skylarks, whose opening cut, "We Have All Got a Past," certainly merits preservation.) However, for beginners this is almost too comprehensive to be useful — the right 20 tunes would have been a superb introduction, but this seems a bit more like a poor man's box set that lost its third disc somewhere. Also, while many regard 1983's Proof Through the Night as Burnett's finest album, the LP has never been given a CD release, and the presence of seven cuts from that album on Twenty Twenty is doubtless a major selling point for longtime fans. However, five of those seven songs have been extensively overhauled by Burnett, with dramatically different remixes (hope you didn't like the drumming on "The Murder Weapon," since it's been wiped away), new overdubs, new vocal tracks, and in the case of "Hula Hoop" some new lyrics, leaving listeners to debate if this represents an artist's prerogative or messing with history (T-Bone, shake hands with George Lucas). Twenty Twenty: The Essential T-Bone Burnett certainly confirms the depth and breadth of Burnett's talent, but it also plays out as too much of a good thing.