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The Science Fiction Album (Box Set)

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Download links and information about The Science Fiction Album (Box Set) by The City Of Prague Philharmonic Orchestra. This album was released in 2002 and it belongs to Theatre/Soundtrack genres. It contains 71 tracks with total duration of 04:53:23 minutes.

Artist: The City Of Prague Philharmonic Orchestra
Release date: 2002
Genre: Theatre/Soundtrack
Tracks: 71
Duration: 04:53:23
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Tracks

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No. Title Length
1. 2001: A Space Odyssey 1:48
2. Aliens 4:50
3. Sound Effect (From "The Nostromo") 1:01
4. Alien 3:50
5. A.I. 3:46
6. Armageddon 5:07
7. Sound Effect (From "Appollo 13") [Lift-Off] 0:52
8. Apollo 13 3:00
9. Back to the Future 3:26
10. Battle Beyond the Stars 4:06
11. Battlestar Galactica 5:10
12. The Black Hole 4:57
13. Contact 8:47
14. Capricorn One 3:17
15. Close Encounters of the Third Kind 8:14
16. The Day the Earth Stood Still 1:47
17. Dune 6:09
18. Galaxy Quest 1:08
19. Sound Effect (From "Dogfight In Space") 1:29
20. Enemy Mine 5:31
21. Ghostbusters 3:12
22. Gremlins 7:43
23. Heavy Metal 5:36
24. Independence Day 9:02
25. E.T. 3:32
26. Judge Dredd 4:50
27. The Last Starfighter 3:07
28. Lifeforce 4:01
29. Sound Effect (From "Crash Landing") 0:46
30. Lost In Space 3:27
31. Mars Attacks 4:01
32. The Matrix 8:07
33. Predator 3:58
34. The Right Stuff 4:44
35. Moonraker 6:07
36. Robocop 9:32
37. Silent Running 4:10
38. Sound Effect (From "Alien Organism") 1:00
39. Species 7:46
40. Starman 4:43
41. Starship Troopers 5:04
42. Starman 4:45
43. Star Trek (TV Theme / The Motion Picture) 2:23
44. End Title 3:54
45. Klingon Attack 5:23
46. Sound Effect (From "Warp Drive") 0:44
47. Star Trek II: The Wrath of Kahn 6:32
48. Star Trek: Deep Space Nine 3:11
49. Star Trek: Generations 4:40
50. Star Trek IV: The Voyage Home 3:35
51. Star Trek VI: The Undiscoverd Country 6:31
52. Sound Effect - Transporter Crew 0:54
53. Star Trek: Deep Space Nine - Main Theme 3:54
54. Star Trek First Contact 5:11
55. Star Wars 5:23
56. The Empire Strikes Back 4:08
57. The Empire Strikes Back 3:09
58. Return of the Jedi 3:52
59. Sound Effect (From "Battle Stations") 0:30
60. The Flag Parade 3:18
61. Anakin's Theme 2:51
62. The Adventures of Jar Jar 3:26
63. Duel of the Fates 4:09
64. The Time Machine 2:29
65. Things to Come 4:00
66. The Thing from Another World 2:05
67. War of the Worlds 4:13
68. When Worlds Collide 4:18
69. Total Recall 2:30
70. You Only Live Twice 4:29
71. Superman 4:13

Details

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Silva America Records shadows the opening of Star Wars: Episode 2 — Attack of the Clones nine days later by releasing this two-CD set of film music drawn from previous science-fiction movies. Typically, the label plays down the actual musical performer, which is as usual the Prague Philharmonic Orchestra, not crediting the group on either the front or back cover, as if the album consisted of original soundtrack recordings instead of the new versions it does contain. The selection serves to emphasize the influence of composer John Williams, who scored Star Wars: Episode 2: Attack of the Clones as well as the previous four Star Wars films, and many others besides, especially those directed by George Lucas or Steven Spielberg. In fact, Williams' work is heard in 11 of the 34 tracks here, far more than that of any other composer, and you can hear his influence on other scores as well. Listen to Bruce Broughton's end titles from Lost in Space and David Arnold's for Independence Day, which use similar big themes and flourishes. (The liner notes rightly point out that Williams himself owes much of his approach to Holst's The Planets and predecessors like Erich Wolfgang Korngold.) There are performances here of music that was not actually heard in the films for which it was written. Jerry Goldsmith's end titles for Alien were replaced, and the version of the main title from the comic Mars Attacks on the disc is actually an early draft. Some composers are better than others at the genre. Henry Mancini sounds like he could be scoring a swashbuckler in his music for Lifeforce, and John Barry's overture for The Black Hole is attractive but doesn't sound like space music. Much of what is here does, though, and it serves to remind listeners of how thrilling space operas can be.