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Hot Burritos! - The Flying Burrito Brothers Anthology 1969-1972

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Download links and information about Hot Burritos! - The Flying Burrito Brothers Anthology 1969-1972 by The Flying Burrito Brothers. This album was released in 2000 and it belongs to Rock, Country genres. It contains 43 tracks with total duration of 02:19:25 minutes.

Artist: The Flying Burrito Brothers
Release date: 2000
Genre: Rock, Country
Tracks: 43
Duration: 02:19:25
Buy on iTunes $19.99

Tracks

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No. Title Length
1. Christine's Tune (A.K.A. Devil in Disguise) 3:02
2. Sin City 4:09
3. Do Right Woman 3:57
4. Dark End of the Street 3:50
5. My Uncle 2:37
6. Wheels 3:02
7. Juanita 2:30
8. Hot Burrito, No. 1 3:37
9. Hot Burrito, No. 2 3:17
10. Do You Know How It Feels (To Be Lonesome) 2:08
11. Hippie Boy 4:55
12. The Train Song 3:04
13. Lazy Days 2:58
14. Image of Me 3:19
15. High Fashion Queen 2:07
16. If You Gotta Go, Go Now 1:49
17. Man in the Fog 2:31
18. Farther Along 4:00
19. Older Guys 2:29
20. Cody, Cody 2:45
21. God's Own Singer 2:05
22. Down in the Churchyard 2:20
23. Wild Horses 6:20
24. Six Days on the Road 2:56
25. Close Up the Honky-Tonks 2:18
26. Break My Mind 2:22
27. Dim Lights, Thick Smoke (And Loud, Loud Music) 2:55
28. Sing Me Back Home 3:50
29. Tonight the Bottle Let Me Down 2:53
30. To Love Somebody 3:19
31. White Line Fever 3:16
32. Colorado 4:52
33. Hand to Mouth 3:44
34. Tried so Hard 3:08
35. Just Can't Be 4:58
36. To Ramona 3:40
37. Four Days of Rain 3:39
38. Can't You Hear Me Calling 2:23
39. All Alone 3:33
40. Why Are You Crying? 3:02
41. Here Tonight 3:29
42. Ain't That a Lot of Love 3:20
43. Losing Game 2:57

Details

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This set assembles about everything The Flying Burrito Brothers recorded in their first four years, including rarities, their two classic country-soul-rock albums with storied singer/songwriter Gram Parsons, and their unheralded third album. The latter is worth noting now: it featured singer Rick Roberts and his gentle country rockers (“Colorado,” “Hand to Mouth”), plus sweet reboots of Bob Dylan’s “To Ramona,” Merle Haggard’s “White Line Fever," and Gene Clark’s “Tried So Hard.” Both lineups of the band were emotive, stirring, and often sorrowful—more about downing draft beer in dimly lit honky-tonks than shouting it out in rock ’n’ roll concert halls.