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Canned Wheat

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Download links and information about Canned Wheat by The Guess Who. This album was released in 1969 and it belongs to Rock, Folk Rock, Hard Rock, Heavy Metal, Pop, Songwriter/Lyricist, Psychedelic genres. It contains 11 tracks with total duration of 49:09 minutes.

Artist: The Guess Who
Release date: 1969
Genre: Rock, Folk Rock, Hard Rock, Heavy Metal, Pop, Songwriter/Lyricist, Psychedelic
Tracks: 11
Duration: 49:09
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Tracks

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No. Title Length
1. No Time 5:35
2. Minstrel Boy 3:18
3. Laughing 3:05
4. Undun 4:17
5. 6 A.M. or Nearer 5:24
6. Old Joe 2:57
7. Of a Dropping Pin 3:42
8. Key 11:16
9. Fair Warning 1:45
10. Species Hawk 5:08
11. Silver Bird 2:42

Details

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As far as late-'60s and early-'70s rock bands go, the Guess Who has been both blessed and cursed. Blessed because their songs are still played quite frequently on oldies radio stations, cursed because they're only remembered for those songs. Truth be told, the Guess Who was a darn good rock band: Burton Cummings's great rock & roll voice — similar in power to Bad Company's Paul Rodgers — keeps even the most overdone Guess Who song fresh, and Randy Bachman's underrated guitar work always serves the song's needs. "Undun"'s wonderful, jazzy riff, which fits the song perfectly, is associated with the overall sound of the Guess Who, not Bachman. 1969's cleverly-titled Canned Wheat introduced several of the band's most remembered songs: "Laughing," "Undun," and "No Time." The album also has six other keepers, including the mellow "6 A.M. or Nearer," complete with jazzy guitar and flute, and the lovely ballad "Minstrel Boy." The original version of "No Time" is fun, even if it isn't radically different; little nuances, like the fade out, shake the listener out of the "I've heard this song a thousand times" syndrome. There are a couple of throwaway bonus tracks, "Species Hawk" and "Silver Bird," that are nice to have, even if they aren't up to the other material. The liner notes are helpful, and it's funny to learn that radio stations ordered copies of "Undun" for airplay, not realizing that it was the B-side of "Laughing." Canned Wheat still sounds incredibly fresh, a product from the heyday of classic rock. For those who want to dig beneath the band's "oldie" status to find the real thing, this album shouldn't be missed. ~ Ronnie D. Lankford, Jr., Rovi