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Little Things (Bonus Track Version)


Download links and information about Little Things (Bonus Track Version) by Toby Lightman. This album was released in 2004 and it belongs to Rock, Pop, Alternative, Songwriter/Lyricist genres. It contains 14 tracks with total duration of 49:06 minutes.

Artist: Toby Lightman
Release date: 2004
Genre: Rock, Pop, Alternative, Songwriter/Lyricist
Tracks: 14
Duration: 49:06
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No. Title Length
1. Leave It Inside 3:02
2. Devils and Angels 3:54
3. Coming Back In 4:08
4. Frightened 3:52
5. The River 3:52
6. Voices 3:43
7. Little Thing 0:49
8. Front Row 3:33
9. Everyday 3:47
10. Is This Right 3:58
11. Don't Wanna Know 3:36
12. Running Away 4:23
13. Devils and Angels (Acoustic) 3:23
14. Leave It Inside (Acoustic) 3:06



It's fortunate that Toby Lightman's vocals are so strong, since it's all that she can do to be heard over the electronic burble of her debut LP, Little Things (Lava/Atlantic). Peter Zizzo's production is furiously contemporary, with programmed percussion, intermittent string sections, shrill electric guitar, and layered vocal collages (of both Lightman's own voice and supporting harmonies) often choking the subtle acoustic chords that run throughout the record. About the only thing missing from the shallow bag of studio tricks is "Robo Toby," the processed vocal effect made infamous by the Matrix. Luckily, the young singer really does have a huge voice. Comparisons to Nelly Furtado and Lauryn Hill are valid; Lightman's phrasing is perfect and her singing's throaty and sassy, even if her lyrics are the usual mix of aw snap empowerment, romantic woe, and dear diary soul-searching. She's mature and confident over the light contemporary R&B of "Leave It Inside" — is that a Mary J. Blige influence? — and the processed poptronica of "The River" gives her some strong material as well. But Lightman's vitality really shines through in "Everyday," which finally, mercifully strips away the accompanying instrumentation to a simple and refreshing acoustic guitar line. The song suggests what Lightman might've sounded like before her tunes were shoehorned into the blatant and unimaginative MOR arrangements that clutter Little Things. They have pop hooks, sure, and the busy, ingratiating "Devils and Angels" or "Frightened"'s tasteful Dido-isms should appeal to casual listeners content with a pretty melody and a comfortably non-threatening smattering of not quite here, not quite there instrumentation. But Little Things' strict adherence to the now sound — as in what is destined to be so yesterday — doesn't give Lightman a fair chance at building an identity.